Darryl.Richman's picture

It has been a little while since I last posted -- sorry about the delay. In that time, I've been busy, however. The R52 is up at Brent Hansen's shop, where we disassembled the transmission and the final drive. There are a couple parts we're waiting for (a new ring and pinion set for the final drive) before putting it back together again. I've decided to go from a 13:57 to a 12:57 set, which will lower my top speed by just a couple mph, but I hope it will allow me to spend more time in 3rd gear, instead of having to downshift at the slightest grade.

(I have also been working on a transmission for my R69 project. And last weekend I had my annual Surf City Tech Day, where about 50 people showed up at my house and ate lots of delectable smoked top sirloin.)

Today, however, a little tinkering has saved the team a nice bit of cash. We riders have been advised to acquire a rally roadbook holder, to make following the route instructions each day a lot easier. If you don't know what that is, welcome to rallying! It's basically a box that is mounted to the handlebars. The course route sheets are taped together into a long scroll and wound onto one of two dowels. Then, as you follow the course, you roll a knob on the outside of the box to scroll the route sheets past the window on top. These are used by enduro riders and bicyclists, mainly, and they used paper that is 4-6" wide so they don't need a huge roadbook holder.

Unfortunately, we will be getting route instructions that are printed on normal 8.5" wide paper. It can be trimmed to 6.5" (just barely) without losing information, but we could have 10 or more sheets to trim and tape every day. Touratech is the only company that produces a roadbook holder for 8.5" paper, although there's an Acerbis model that will take 6.5" paper. They're expensive, though: the Touratech unit is $210:

I'm sure that, like all the great stuff from Touratech, this thing is bombproof. Being the cheap guy that I am, I've been musing over what I could make or adapt for this function. I was wandering through Home Depot a week ago -- I needed a hose clamp for a new dryer vent -- when I noticed a parts box that looked like it might be useful for carrying an assortment of extra fasteners on this trip. Suddenly, I had a flash: this was my roadbook holder!

At $3.50 for the clear, soft plastic box, with a real hinged top that clamps closed, it wasn't a huge gamble. A couple extra trips to the hardware store to look at "stuff" netted me two 1' x 1/4" aluminum rods, some nylon spacers and bushings and axle nuts. A couple of small, wooden drawer knobs, and my shopping was complete. It cost me a bit north of $10.

I threaded one end of each dowel and screwed the knobs on. I cut out some of the internal separator walls to leave me a near perfect 8 3/4" width area. I only had to drill holes on one side of the box for the dowels, because I had one internal separator left to support them. I drilled holes and installed the nylon bushings with a dab of caulk. The dowels turn with some friction in the nylon bushings, which holds the paper exactly where I turn it. The pictures below show my roadbook holder with 21 uncut 8.5 x 11 pages loaded, and there's room for even more if needed.

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Comments

Darryl, I made something

Bob Childers's picture

Darryl, I made something similar to this probably 45/50 years ago for enduros. I made mine out of aluminum and to use adding machine paper since that was all I had handy. It mounted between the handle bars and worked fine. I still have the box here someplace. Bob

Hi..

Motorcycle Trader's picture

Nice.
You had done good job.

Now sell one to each of the

miller6997's picture

Now sell one to each of the Cannonball entrants and you've recovered the cost of your new ring and pinion. When's your IPO?

'67 R69S
'05 R1200RT

Scrolling Away

Jim Hansen's picture

In this high-tech age of GPS, iPhones, etc., I find the visual image of a person (who happens to be a computer expert) scrolling through numerous doweled pages of route instructions to be rather humorous. On the other hand, if you're riding a 1928 R52, I suppose it's quite appropriate.

Awesome

LtJ's picture

Great low tech/budget idea!

Something old, something new

Darryl.Richman's picture

Quote:

In this high-tech age of GPS, iPhones, etc., I find the visual image of a person (who happens to be a computer expert) scrolling through numerous doweled pages of route instructions to be rather humorous. On the other hand, if you're riding a 1928 R52, I suppose it's quite appropriate.

Funny thing, isn't it? We're allowed, even required, to update our bikes in certain ways, but prohibited in others. There's no limitation, for example, to how modern the brakes can be, but we're supposed to retain the original carburetion and ignition. We are allowed to have cell phones, but GPS systems are prohibited -- how does that work for any modern smartphone?

--Darryl Richman
http://darryl.crafty-fox.com
"Bling is not made in Germany" --OTL, 12/05

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