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Guaire
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Arlington, VA
Joined: 08/16/2016
Posts: 33

What I said, tossing the Shinkos. Looking to hear from experienced rubber scuffers here. I want to get more traction, especially on wet pavement. I avoided a collision recently, but my front end washed out, and I'm still sore. My ride is a 1983 R80RT. Current rubber is Front 100/90 19 and Rear 120/90 18, Shinko tires. I went to my local shop to check availability.
Looks the ME888s are available 110/90 19. The ME888 is also available in 110/90 18. I have run Metzlers on other machines.
Also available are Pirellis rear, 120/90 18R MT66. and the MT66-F 100/90S 19.
I rode the MT66 set up on a 1982 Honda Nighthawk 450. Good sticky tires with a nice profile. I could stuff them into a turn with no problems. Pretty good for a bike with a tube/pressed steel frame.
Anyone here have experience, opinions on either of these two set ups, with any recommendations, I would appreciate hearing from you.
Cheers,
Bill

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1983 R80RT, 2014 Royal Enfield Continental GT, 1986 Honda VF500F

ECJ
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VBMWMO #9464
Joined: 12/15/2017
Posts: 3
I've been running Michelin

I've been running Michelin Pilot Activ's on my 1979 R80/7 and have been more than pleased. Might be worth checking out:

http://moto.michelin.com/motorbike/michelin/desktop/DC/en/tyres/products...

Best,

ECJ

khittner
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VBMWMO #8223
Joined: 02/15/2012
Posts: 369
+1 on Pilot Activs. I don't

+1 on Pilot Activs. I don't press the performance envelopes of tires, but I've ridden my RT confidently in rain heavy enough to have 18-wheelers pulling off to the side of the interstate, if that's a useful indicator of wet weather competence. Not as "sipey" as the Metz ME-33/Lasertecs that I used for decades, but they do seem to work just fine. Available in the correct 3.25 x 19 and 4.00 x 18 sizes for your twin shock airhead.

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Konrad

Guaire
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Arlington, VA
Joined: 08/16/2016
Posts: 33
Sounds good. I'll be ordering

Sounds good. I'll be ordering the Activs today.
Keeping the rubber side down is really important.
"Real motorcyclists don't need tattoos. We have bruises."

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1983 R80RT, 2014 Royal Enfield Continental GT, 1986 Honda VF500F

Guaire
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Arlington, VA
Joined: 08/16/2016
Posts: 33
Victory on the front tire.

Victory on the front tire. It's on.
I could use some advice on how to get the rear tire out. It has been pulled away from the brake and hub. Trying to get it out the left side is a squeeze between the fender and the luggage rack. The luggage rack seems to be welded into the rear sub-frame. Even if I remove the shock top nut and bolt, it will still be welded to the rear sub-frame. My manual skips the '83 R80RT. Looks like I have to remove the rear fender, or the rear sub-frame to get the wheel/tire out.
Anyone have the best way to get this wheel of the bike and into the shop?
Cheers,
Bill

  • rear_out.jpg
  • front_active.jpg
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1983 R80RT, 2014 Royal Enfield Continental GT, 1986 Honda VF500F

schrader7032
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VBMWMO #7032
San Antonio, TX
Joined: 10/27/2006
Posts: 6540
I forget what size tire you

I forget what size tire you have on. At any rate, what I've done is to totally deflate the tire...remove the valve core. Then I get two thin-ish pieces of cardboard and put on each side of the rubber where it conflicts with the left shock mount and the brake hub. While ensuring that the bike is stable and won't come off the center stand, I begin to pull the tire out the rear, possibly rocking the tire back and forth using the cardboard for sliding. Watch that the top rear of the tire clears the fender.

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Kurt in S.A.
'78 R100/7 '69 R69S '52 R25/2

mark_weiss
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Arizona
Joined: 11/17/2013
Posts: 172
The tire and wheel can be

The tire and wheel can be removed from the bottom. Remove the front wheel and tip the bike forward so that the fork legs rest on the ground. This is a very steady postion, but if you are unsure, strap the centerstand to the exhaust cross over pipe. In this position, you can wriggle the rear wheel and tire out from the bottom.

This method is often quicker and easier than removing the left-side bag mount.

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Mark
qualitycycleservice.com

schrader7032
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VBMWMO #7032
San Antonio, TX
Joined: 10/27/2006
Posts: 6540
I've heard of this method to

I've heard of this method to "kneel" the front end and drop the tire out the bottom. Whenever I've removed my 4.00 tires out using the method I described, it requires some wriggling and pulling as I mentioned. If the backend is way up in the air, seems to me you still are going to have to wriggle and pull to get the rubber by the very same choke point. That seems to me to a risky thing with the bike in such a precarious position.

Whatever works, I guess.

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Kurt in S.A.
'78 R100/7 '69 R69S '52 R25/2

Guaire
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Arlington, VA
Joined: 08/16/2016
Posts: 33
Finally got the bugger out

Finally got the bugger out yesterday. I removed the left luggage rack, the left shock unit, the left muffler. Then all I had to do was squeeze the tire with a carpenter's clamp to force the thing out.
The worst mess ever. Why put on a crappy compound tire that's too big???
Thank you for the help, Mark and Kurt, in telling me that it could be done.

Merry Christmas,
Bill

  • open_rear_wheel_1.jpg
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1983 R80RT, 2014 Royal Enfield Continental GT, 1986 Honda VF500F

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