38 replies [Last post]
johnpst
johnpst's picture
 Offline
Hawaii
Joined: 03/22/2016
Posts: 57

Aloha all,

I restore bikes occasionally. Recently, I got the bug for a BSA Gold Star and during my research was inspired by a gentleman named Swan on the BSA Do The Ton Cafe Racer Forum; http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=20929.0.

Swan chronicled the journey he had with his DBD34 Gold Star, very similar to what I am working on. His description inspired me to share with you folks my 1955 R50 build. Swan has helped me to see options and resources in the BSA world which reminded me of some of the lessons I have learned about my BMW over time so, here goes.

This first post will be the longest since I've been at this for over a year now. A lot has happened. I'll cover the highlights and the important stuff here.

I have been a motorcycle fanatic for almost 50 years. I've ridden and raced just about everything with two wheels. As i age I'm getting nostalgic. Full disclosure, my commuting bike is a 2006 BMW R1200RT with the foot pegs ground to nubs and as much ware on the sides of the tires as on the center. Last year, I ran into an ad for a not running 1955 BMW R50 with Earles Forks. It brought me back to 1974 and my riding buddy Scott. We spend some quality time in Topanga Canyon, him on his R60 and me on my K550F. I met a business owner entrepreneur named Mark who had purchased the bike a couple of years before. The bike just stopped running and he didn't have time to get it running. We talked about politics, business, and motorcycles. He agreed to a reasonable settlement from his asking prices and I loaded the bike in my pickup truck, wife and dog riding shotgun.

The VIN is very near the beginning of the 1955 production run. Numbers all match and the bike was complete, as far as I could tell. My plan? Get it running and ride it of course. Problem? The engine was seized. After sticking a borescope in the cylinders, the right side was rusted solid. I pulled the pan and dug through with a magnet and visually inspected the rest of the bike and found nothing besides the stuck slug on the right side. That's where you all come in. I found VBMO and started reading.

First job was to get the piston unstuck. I fill the cylinder with WD40 and ATF and left the bike sitting for a week. After the week was up, I tried to kick the bike over. No good. I tried bump starting the bike. No good. DO NOT DO THIS. More on bump starting a press fit crankshaft later but, if your engine is stuck, do not force it any harder than the kick starter will allow.

I went about pulling the heads to inspect further. The bike had been apart before. The pistons were not original but, they were original 68 mm size though. Good! Minimal potential for having to replace expensive parts. The right side piston took some persuasion to get moving. About two weeks of soaking, heating, and mechanical agitation. I finally got it loose. Yeehaw! I measured everthing up, I honed the cylinders, bought new rings and reassembled. After going though the ignition and fuel system I was able to get the bike running. No real drama. In riding the bike I found the rolling chassis pretty good and the engine with NO power. The transmission shifted as smoothly as I though it should. The lack of power was really an issue. I pulled the plugs and check compression. 65 psig. Hmmm? I added some oil to the cylinders and checked again. No real change. I did a leak down test. The valves and rings (not unexpected after honing the cylinders) were leaking like crazy. All else thing being what they were, a top end and piston oversize seemed in order.

Here's where some drama came in. I did my due diligence and chose a shop in California to help me with the top end. We spoke on the phone, swapped e-mails, and agreed that he could do the work. After providing a specification as to how I want the work done (I'm an engineer and work on large scale jet engines for power industry. I provide specifications for everything.) the one question I did not ask was, how long this shop would have my parts. In my business I give daily updates on progress, with specific findings. I thought at least weekly would be reasonable for doing what I consider to be 10th grade auto-shop work when I went to school. I specifically looked for folks who had experience with these bikes because there are critical dimensions that only experience will know to check. Reading any reliable tech manual will get it done but, there's no replacement for experience. I prompted every week for an update. I would get answers about cleaning and installation before I got messages about disassembly. In other words, the vendor was BSing me. Bottom line was, the question I didn't ask was, how long it would take. it took 6 months to disassemble, clean, inspect, install new guides, replace the seats, and bore and hone two cylinders. The vendor started giving me excuses that he couldn't find springs and keepers. It took me twenty minutes to located some and sent them to him. I paid $700.00 more than we estimated plus I bought the valve gear because he "couldn't find any". Lesson? Don't be fooled by Facebook pages with great story's about the 90 year old mentor and friend teaching the old ways. My cylinders were not to specification. They were dirty when I received them which holidays in the paint. ring gaps were incorrect, valve springs were larger diameter than OEM and did not fit as designed. In the end, I had to rebuild the heads. The machine work on the guides was correctly done and the seats were properly installed. I can only assume he had someone else do that work. Buyer beware! Any vendor that tells you they do not have time to document their work is not worth partnering up with.

That was the only bad experience so, I'll move on.

I got the top end installed and got the bike running again. Yeehaw again! Much better After a good tune up I started the break-in period. Changed the oil a couple of times in the first 100 miles just to be sure (Valvoline VR-1). I rode the bike to work and got the oohs and awes of my fellow gear heads. The suspension was a little mushy and the tires were over 10 years old so, It was time to do "the little things" to make the bike a safe rider. I also found the voltage regulator was not working correctly. I found the coil insulation was old and leaking which caused shorted wingdings, changing the voltage the regulator would hold to 12.8. No enough to ride across country but, fine for a day rider, until I decided to cruise the beach one night. It was unnerving to ride at night when the headlamp dimmed every time the bike was at a stop. I bought a new VR (see other post for that story). After cleaning and testing, the dynamo worked fine. Problem solved.

Tires were changed, rims were cleaned, and the brakes freshened up. I bought new liners and riveted them in myself. I chucked up the wheels in one of my mills at work and clean up the brakes. No drama. Bike stops like it should, not well. Over the next week I found multiple minor things to adjust and replace. The speedometer warbled like I remember the magnetic styles of my childhood so, off it came for a cleaning and inspection. No drama. The mileage ticker however clicks away at at least twice the actual mileage. I'll deal with that later. I changed the headlamp with a halogen bulb. Much improved. Similarly, I replaced the rear brake lamp with LED drop in replacement. Again, great improvement.

After a week of tinkering and riding to work, 5 miles away, a knocking began in the lower end. Hmmm? I did just do a top end. Maybe the wrist (gudgen) pin, which was 0.0015" smaller than the bushing (I though I'd fix it later when I installed it) was the problem. In steps Dan Niener of CycleWorks. Dan helped me with a bushing replacement tool. "Off With Her Head". The tool works perfectly. I measured everything up and found it to be right were it was on reassembly a week earlier but, replaced the bushing anyway since I bought the tool and it was apart. Curious. If nothing changed, then where is the noise coming from.

I put it all back together and found the noise was still there. Hmmm? I laid the bike up and ran it weekly to keep everything oiled and help troubleshoot. I used screwdrivers and stethoscopes to try and isolate where the sound was coming from. The knocking was intermittent, not like a rod bearing. I could not isolate where the sound was coming from. Cam? Nose? Crank? I took run-out on both shafts and found the nose of the crank to have 0.025 run out. This is well out of spec but, the spec if for the crankshaft isolated on a mandrel. Hmmm? After 6 months of reading and thinking, I finally pulled the engine apart. CycleWorks has provided me with the Many In One tool which works as described. When I got the timing cover off I could see that the oil pump gear was torn up. Probably salvageable but, more on that later. Further inspection found the nose bearing race had grenaded. The race bits were sitting in the bottom of the timing cover. Now I'm thinking, ok, now I can go with the original plan. Replace the bearing, get back on the road and restore later. Luckily, I thought better of that idea. I pulled the whole thing apart and found the rear bearing grenaded. Measuring the connecting rods found the bearings to be out of spec. I called Dan at CycleWorks and cried on his shoulder a bit about my last experience with a vendor and had him estimate looking at the crankshaft. He found that the webs had slipped causing the run-out to be excessive. Remember, I told you I'd get back to not forcing a seized engine any harder than the kick start will allow. Apparently, the force of bump starting was enough to cause the crankshaft to deviate resulting in taking a 60+ year old crankshaft and 40+ year old bearings and shredding the races.

The crank will be restored to factory specs. the connecting rods will be honed and larger bearings installed to tighten them up to the crank pins. The flywheel will be lightened up to help with shifting.

I've completely disassembled the bike for restoration now. The tank, fenders and miscellaneous painted bits are at the painter now. All proper BMW Avus Black paint and white pin striping specifications have been provided. I still have some disassembly work to do before getting the frame to the powder coating shop. My daughter and granddaughter are in town so, it will be a couple of weeks before anything changes.

So, now we're all caught up. Here's some photos to walk through the progress. See ya in a couple of weeks.

John

  • img_0674.jpg
  • img_0689.jpg
  • img_4801.jpg
  • img_0721.jpg
  • img_4822.jpg
  • img_4807.jpg
  • img_0753.jpg
  • img_1313.jpg
  • img_1366.jpg
  • img_1367.jpg
  • img_5106.jpg
  • img_5131.jpg
  • img_5106.jpg
  • img_5112.jpg
  • img_5119.jpg
__________________

John
55 - R50, 06-R1200RT, 96-M900, 10-TU250x

808Airhead
808Airhead's picture
 Offline
VBMWMO #7677
Joined: 08/05/2009
Posts: 991
John,I am friends with

John,I am friends with Mark,and he offered me that bike,but I already have 4 and passed. I am on Oahu,so are you I am assuming,and have rebuilt engines,transmissions,final drives,etc.,and I have every tool you need to do this stuff,even a engine/transmission stand. If you need help give me a e-mail and I will shoot you my #. My bikes run to perfection and have 1000's of reliable miles on them,so if you need any help give me a shout. If you want to install your crank,you are more than welcome to come over and borrow my engine stand and I can help walk you through it. I had a shop ream my valve guides and cut the seats,but installed new guides and rebuilt them myself.

  • img_5473.jpg
__________________

Thomas M.
R69s - R60/2 - R67/2 - R51/3

808Airhead
808Airhead's picture
 Offline
VBMWMO #7677
Joined: 08/05/2009
Posts: 991
John,I am friends with

My latest project was this 1951 R51/3 I just rebuilt the engine/rear drive,wheels/forks,etc. on . I RIDE them and restore them

  • img_3594.jpg
  • img_4823.jpg
__________________

Thomas M.
R69s - R60/2 - R67/2 - R51/3

johnpst
johnpst's picture
 Offline
Hawaii
Joined: 03/22/2016
Posts: 57
Time to get into the details

Aloha and Mahalo Thomas!

I may take you up on your offer. I've been considering my options. No matter what, the R50 will be a rider. It's a matter of how shiny and perfect. I think part of that decision has been made by the purchase of stainless bolt kits. My instructions to the painter, Hannibal on Sand Island, was to make it look like a well cared for original paint job. As you know, the paint was in pretty good condition. Now, do I blast the engine case to new or, hand clean it to a well cared for patina, which is my preference now. I'm getting distracted by stainless spokes and polishing up the rims. I still have time so, let's get on to the short stories of what was done before I started this post.

The dynamo. As I mentioned, when I got the bike running, the voltage regulator was not putting out adequate voltage. This story is a paragraph but, the actual job took a week of after hours study.

As you all know, the dynamo is a 6 volt x 45 watt direct current generator. In my world of power generation, the concept is, a magnetic field, relative motion, and conductors. Simple enough. The problem is, controlling that voltage so that it conducts enough current at the right voltage to light up the lamps. In today's semi-conductor world, all of that is effortless. In the 50's, it was a matter of mathematics and mechanics.

The original voltage regulator uses ohms law, springs, and contact points to work. Some of the power from the dynamo is diverted to the voltage regulator and powers a magnet. This magnet pulls an iron core attached to a lever which has contact points on it. The contact points carry electrons to the dynamo field. The cool part is, the current in the electromagnet builds a reverse current after a short time which turns the coil off. The field contacts open. This is repeated multiple times a second keeping just enough magnetic field in the dynamo to generate 6 volts up to 45 watts. Ingenious! Well, 60 years of riding has caused the insulation on the voltage regulator coils to leak allowing them to short out. This changes the magnetic field and therefore the ability to maintain the proper voltage for keeping the light on and charge the battery. Now, this can certainly be fixed by skilled craftsman like Tony at Sako Electric in Hawaii. The problem for me is, they were never that reliable to begin with and the time to rewind it correctlty would take a couple of days. There are other alternatives.

I purchased two solid state, modern regulators. A MZ ETZ 6V ELECTRONIC VOLTAGE REGULATOR and a TYP BMW R51/3 - 69S regulator. The MZ was poorly made with cold solder joints and would have had to be mounted away from the generator, like under the tank. I the TYP BMW. There was some confusion on the instructions but, a little work figuring it out and it works flawlessly and installes easily.

Problem solved. See the photos.

  • img_0756.jpg
  • img_0754.jpg
  • img_4845.jpg
  • img_4830.jpg
  • img_4831.jpg
  • img_0733.jpg
  • img_0753.jpg
  • img_4843.jpg
__________________

John
55 - R50, 06-R1200RT, 96-M900, 10-TU250x

808Airhead
808Airhead's picture
 Offline
VBMWMO #7677
Joined: 08/05/2009
Posts: 991
Hello John,I am actually

Hello John,I am actually using 2 of those same regulators in 2 of my bikes right now,they work perfectly. Be careful with Hannibal (from Psycledelics) he painted my R69S and did not do the striping correctly and I see "veins" p[opping up under the paint after only a couple years due to poor preparation. He also took longer than expected and when I told him I was taking it to "Cosmic airbrush",he then rushed the job out the door to get it back to me. I will never use him again.
On my R69S I used complete stainless kit and spokes,and SS spokes on all my bikes,well worth it. I have the wheel truing template for /2 and a truing stand,so if you lace them up,I can help you true them. I run my own auto repair business and am very busy,but summer is coming up and the waves are not as consistent so I have more free time for bikes. Where do you live? I can stop by one day with my R60/2 and give you some inspiration. I just rebuilt the engine and trans on that and runs and shifts better than the 17K original mile motor it was.

__________________

Thomas M.
R69s - R60/2 - R67/2 - R51/3

JDL
JDL's picture
 Offline
VBMWMO #9373
Joined: 02/18/2013
Posts: 10
Hi John, I will follow your

Hi John,

I will follow your progress. It looks like after a not so good start things are falling into place. I'm curious as to who is that first engine builder. Whenever I hear stories like that I take a mental note and try to avoid certain vendors. However, if no names are mentioned it's impossible to avoid them.

Thanks,

JDL

__________________

JDL
'55 R25/3, '80 R65, '01 R1100S

Slash2
Slash2's picture
 Offline
VBMWMO #9015
Joined: 10/17/2015
Posts: 257
I'm moving

808, Why aren't you my neighbor?

__________________

64' R60/2 - 66' R27 - 51' R67 - 68' R69S
88' R100RS - 06' K12R

johnpst
johnpst's picture
 Offline
Hawaii
Joined: 03/22/2016
Posts: 57
Let's talk about slingers

Aloha,

Thanks Thomas. I've sent you an IM int the past. I'll try again and see if we can get together on this. I was avoiding doing the transmission for now but, since there is some expertise close by, I may just take it on.

JDL, even though I paid full boat for the head rebuild, I do feel i'm entitled to bitch a bit, I will keep that to myself on the site. I will send you the information personally though if you really need. I don't think it's hard to figure out the one shop in Northern California that has a great Facebook page though. I'm sure he's competent overall but, my job, not so much. What I didn't say was all the concourse events he attended while my heads were sitting in his shop not being worked on. That's all in the past now so, I'll hele (Hawaiian for move) on.

So, we've all hear Vech talk about slingers. He's right. Though I didn't have issues with mine, yet, I do have some photos to show that it's important. the crud will fill up the slingers and migrate to the oiling ports on the crank pins eventually starving the connecting rods of oil.

The crud is not has hard as I thought from the discussions on the boards but, it is there and will not come loose without removal of the crank and thorough cleaning.

I DO NOT recommend even attempting to change oil to a detergent oil or running any solvents in there. As a consulting turbine engineer, I have learned that unless you completely disassemble and get critical parts out of the way like bearings, pumps, orifices, relief valves... In other words everything but the tank and piping, you will do damage. Do even a little research on the use of detergent oils on older engines in the 60's and 70's and you will see a trail of destruction. There is no doubt that you have something in your oil passages that's comfortably stuck right where it is. If you get it loose, it's going to find something like the passages in your crank pins or cylinder lubrication and destroy your engine. Just leave it alone. Periodically, disassemble your engine, clean the slingers and oil passages and put it back together. it's just not that hard.

As for how often, all I know is some things that will extend the period between. Again, extend to what? I don't know. I challenge anyone to says they do to produce their crystal ball. The guys that service these engines routinely will have the best data. Conditions inside your engine are the only constant and none of us can know that.

1. Change the oil often. Removing the particulate is the only reliable method of prevention.
2. Using a magnetic drain plug or some of the pan magnets available will help reduce the steel particulate in the oil. I say help because as long as the engine is running, metal particles will NOT settle on the magnet in any significant way. It's only when the engine is sitting that the magnets will be of most benefit. The good news is that the aluminum is softer than than steel so, it will do less abrasive damage. The bad news is, it will still plug oiling orifices in the crank pins and the bearings rolling over it will cause micro-vibration.

As long as the engine is running you have an active and effective centrifuge operating. That's why detergent oil, even in a fresh engine will not do any good. The heavier metal will still settle out in the slingers due to centrifugal force.

I've done the math and there is no way to put an effective oil filtering system on the installed oil pumping system. It is possible to install some electric "kidney pump" oil filter system however, I don't know of any. The problem with a kidney pump oil filtering system is, the oil is not filtered before entering the slingers so, at best, it will only increase the time between oil changes. Certainly the price of installing one is more than the price of changing oil multiple times. There are various deep oil pans with magnets in them which will increase the volume and therefore dilute the amount of particulate / volume of oil. The bad news? Centrifuges don't care! They are patent and will see every drop of oil and entrained metal at some point.

Here's some photos.

  • img_2774.jpg
  • img_2762.jpg
  • img_2760.jpg
  • img_5126.jpg
  • img_5130.jpg
  • img_2777.jpg
  • img_2778.jpg
  • img_5125.jpg
  • img_5123.jpg
__________________

John
55 - R50, 06-R1200RT, 96-M900, 10-TU250x

808Airhead
808Airhead's picture
 Offline
VBMWMO #7677
Joined: 08/05/2009
Posts: 991
/2,I wish we were ALL

/2,I wish we were ALL neighbors! LOL
John,I just checked my message box,the last message in there was from Darryl Richman in 2011,lol. There are no messages from you in there,try again or my e-mail taivw@hotmail.com

  • img_5004.jpg
__________________

Thomas M.
R69s - R60/2 - R67/2 - R51/3

schrader7032
schrader7032's picture
 Offline
VBMWMO #7032
San Antonio, TX
Joined: 10/27/2006
Posts: 6270
I believe there is a problem

I believe there is a problem with the internal messaging system. Best to use emails for contact.

__________________

Kurt in S.A.
'78 R100/7 '69 R69S '52 R25/2

808Airhead
808Airhead's picture
 Offline
VBMWMO #7677
Joined: 08/05/2009
Posts: 991
Mystery solved!! That is why

Mystery solved!! That is why I never replied to your message John,I never got it!!

__________________

Thomas M.
R69s - R60/2 - R67/2 - R51/3

JDL
JDL's picture
 Offline
VBMWMO #9373
Joined: 02/18/2013
Posts: 10
Hi John, Yes, I have a good

Hi John,

Yes, I have a good idea to whom you're referring. I've had dealings with that shop also but most of my dealing have been positive. I'm glad you're bike is complete and running well. You did a nice job of restoring the bike. And yes, it was motivation for me to pick up another bike and start over. I'm just not sure which model or manufacturer. I bought my first British bike(64' Triumph Bonneville) a few years ago and it's almost complete. Just waiting to get the tank and fenders painted. I may go with another British bike or a Ducati.

Take care,

JDL

__________________

JDL
'55 R25/3, '80 R65, '01 R1100S

johnpst
johnpst's picture
 Offline
Hawaii
Joined: 03/22/2016
Posts: 57
Speaking of swing-arm bearings

Thank JDL. It's for that reason that I don't want to just bag on the guy. I also think if this were a common occurrence that there would be a lot more complaining going on so, my experience is the odd-man-out.

So, as I was removing my swing-arm pivot point rust, there seemed to be what looked like bearings. Hmmm. That's odd. Why would there be bearings at the pivot. Further investigation revealed that BMW designed them that way so, off to get new bearings. But what to do with the rust? Remove it I guess. Being in the shape of bearings I decided rust remover may not work so, I got out my trusty bearing puller, provided by Dan at CycleWorks. An ingenious device for it's simplicity.

Hmmm, the first ball of rust on the right side front was resisting so, I moved on to the others. The left front. No problem. Came out with just the right amount of force. The right rear, difficult but, again, with a little heat it came out without much fuss. Left rear, easier than the right. Back to the the right front. Liberal amounts of heat and cold on the outer race damn near completely destroyed the puller. Now, one might think that I would move to the press and get a blind puller and remove this but, Dan and CycleWorks took the time to design this tool and I paid for it so, it's got to work Good engineering cannot fail. Multiple attempts to get the shoulder of the screws under the outer race pulled the heads off the screws. Multiple beers, loud music and persistence, five hours of it, paid off. I now have an almost completely destroyed bearing puller and a ball of rust in the shape of a tapered bearing outer race.

So, the lesson. Really none. I enjoyed the beer and the loud music. Two out of three isn't bad for a Saturday afternoon.

For those of you who may not have beer or loud music to dull the pain of continually pulling back an empty stump of a puller, here are some suggestions.

1. Be prepared with a blind puller. The CycleWorks puller will work fine for parts that have not cold welded to the bore they are stuck in.
2. A day or week before you plan on removing the bearing, apply Kroil, WD40, or other penetrating oil. Occasionally heat the bore expanding it so the fluid can penetrate and oil it up again. I had canned compressed air (CO2 in a bottle) that I used to shrink the stuck part while the OD was heated.
3. Light raps with an 8 oz or smaller hammer will help to shake the OD around the hardened outer bearing race, further loosening the rust. CAUTION! Do not hit it hard enough to flare the OD in. The mild steel bearing bore will gall on it's way out causing you to possibly have to weld repair and re-machine the bore.
4. Be patient. Remember, the machine never wins.

Thanks all for looking. Hopefully this will help someone.

John

  • img_5153.jpg
  • img_5154.jpg
  • img_5144.jpg
  • img_5143.jpg
__________________

John
55 - R50, 06-R1200RT, 96-M900, 10-TU250x

808Airhead
808Airhead's picture
 Offline
VBMWMO #7677
Joined: 08/05/2009
Posts: 991
Damn,that looks like a hell

Damn,that looks like a hell of an effort. I took mine out in 10 minutes a side by welding a bead all around the face of the race,when they cooled down and contracted they literally almost fell out of the swingarm. The welding heats them up nice,but this method is only if you intend to refinish the arm. I was powdercoating my frame and swingarm,so I used this technique in the rear swingarm and front swingarm.
I applaud your persistence,we share the same tenaciousness!

__________________

Thomas M.
R69s - R60/2 - R67/2 - R51/3

Daves79x
Daves79x's picture
 Offline
VBMWMO #9030
Joined: 08/09/2015
Posts: 227
Great effort! You can just

Great effort! You can just replace the screws on the puller if they wear out.

Dave

__________________

Dave

johnpst
johnpst's picture
 Offline
Hawaii
Joined: 03/22/2016
Posts: 57
THANKS FOR THE ENCOURAGEMENT, PARTS STARTING TO ARRIVE

Dave, that's the elegance of the tool. Easily repair/replace parts.

Tomas, I was going to do the weld bead, having read about it, but, I just didn't want to take it to my shop at work. You know the story, "just one more pull". "It will take me longer to drive in than to keep going". With the success of the second, third, fourth attempt gave me confidence the first one was just an anomaly. Many beers and good music, just kept going on it. I do plan on more restorations so a welder is in my future.

Parts are starting to arrive for the rebuild. The tank and fenders are in at paint now. The frame will go in next week when my kids go back to the mainland. I will keep this story going until I get back on the road.

Thanks for the encouragement. Here's some more photos of the purchase with some scattered disassembly photos.

John

  • img_0674.jpg
  • img_0679.jpg
  • img_0732.jpg
  • img_0768.jpg
__________________

John
55 - R50, 06-R1200RT, 96-M900, 10-TU250x

Daves79x
Daves79x's picture
 Offline
VBMWMO #9030
Joined: 08/09/2015
Posts: 227
Good Info

So glad you are chronicling your project. Too few of us have. I admire your efforts at getting the bike running. And you ultimately found out what was inevitable-that a complete tear-down was necessary. 60 plus years can do a lot of damage and wear to a bike and the only way to know is to take it completely down. I think you are going about it the right way now and you will be very pleased with the results. Mine took a year and a half and was worth every hour and dollar to see it back on the road. Keep us up to date when you can.

Dave

__________________

Dave

johnpst
johnpst's picture
 Offline
Hawaii
Joined: 03/22/2016
Posts: 57
SHOCKS, PHYSICS, AND 8TH GRADE

Aloha,

I just got back from California. I had a chance to be surrounded by others who were teased for the pocket protectors, geeky haircut, and Ti-35 calculator. We just celebrated our 20th anniversary meeting for the W501D5A combustion turbine user's group. We talked about creep, embitterment, balance vectors and drank beer. Not necessarily in that order.

So,since I don't have a lot of progress to report, I'll fill you in on a law of physics lesson. After many attempts to gain insight from those in the know regarding removing the rear shock damper from the shock retainer.

Over a month ago, I spend three quality hours with a damper clamp, a torch, Kroil, WD40, more heat, some beer, and a hammer trying to remove the dampers as advertise in every article I could find. One issue I found that was not published where I could find it was, the damper tube is manufactured in two pieces. The end that threads into the retainer is machined in such a way that the upper, hollow tube, fits over it and is crimped. Clamping it tightly into a vice and damper clamp should fix the damper. Using a dowel or other properly sized round instrument, you should be able to strike the dowel and break it loose from the damper. Unless...

As mentioned above, I worked on mine for quite some time. I called ans wrote many folks in the know until Richard from Vech's Benchmark Works informed me that he knew exactly what I was talking about. I'm sure I'm not the first to run into this but, it would have been hard to tell from the answers I was getting from folks. Anyway, Richard advised I pinch the damper in the vice since it's trashed anyway, heat the retainer, tap it with a hammer around the circumference, careful not to damage the aluminum, and give it a shot. 10 minutes, a beer, and a little propane and both sides off.

The rub? After 40 years as an engineer, I got my ass handed to me by one of the most basic laws of physics. For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. I was using a rubber mallet to strike the lever in the retainer trying not to damage the parts. Mistake. The rubber absorbed the energy and bounced back instead of applying torque to the threaded portion. Striking it with a steel hammer around the circumference of the retainer loosened 60 years of grit and a nice moderate strike on the lever cracked them both off almost first blow.

The frame is being power coated and the paintwork is still in progress. Should be starting some buildup soon.

Good luck all.

__________________

John
55 - R50, 06-R1200RT, 96-M900, 10-TU250x

johnpst
johnpst's picture
 Offline
Hawaii
Joined: 03/22/2016
Posts: 57
I HAVE NO IDEA WHAT'S GOING ON...

Aloha,

I'm going to put this small post up without pictures and see if it gets published. I've posted two updates over the past two months and they don't make it. I was filling some time while I waited for paint, powder coating, and parts, by writing about the crankshaft. If this works, I will backtrack and re-post with pictures.

I sent my crankshaft to Dan at CycleWorks. Long story short, exactly as advertised. He's corrected the damage caused by bump starting (see above for that story). He's commissioned some of his support folks to balance everything, lighten the flywheel (which I'll comment on after riding it for a while), boring the connecting rods for over-sized bearings. I checked everything when I received it and it's all as stated. Dan provided the work, documented it, communicated, and delivered it in a timely manner. Mahalo! More on this when I'm sure it will get posted.

Before I continue, I am building a "roller" as the Barrington Motor Works calls it. My goal is for the bike to look like a very well taken care of 60+ year old bike. My primary reason for restoring it was finding all the critical parts worn beyond safe operation. I ride by concourses I don’t stop at them.

Okay, moving forward with the build, I got the frame back from powder coating two weeks ago. Awesome! It really paid off to go with someone who works with motorcycles. Regal here in Kapolei Hawaii, who changed their name from Hi Tech while my parts were there, got it right. They did a proper job of protecting the threads and weep holes. Caution, as has been mentioned a hundred times on this site, power coat is thicker than paint and may require some thinning to get things like the engine mounts to fit smoothly. It's not a problem, just know about it up front. Trying to fit the engine in the frame with the spacers without thinking about the coating thickness could result in a substantial chunk coming out of the coating.

I've got the shocks and front fork swingarm built. Fortunately, nothing really to report. Follow the instructions and it pretty much assembles itself. I chased all the threads before assembling. I cleaned the powder coat from the spring shields so the shock end will fit through. I chose not to install a zerk fitting on the front end because it just makes sense to me to disassemble it every couple of years, clean, inspect, and correct issues. I'm not a big believer in installing reasons to ignore things. Now, if the bearing could be sealed I might engineer a way to keep water out and forget it but, it is what it is and it's just not that hard to do this maintenance. Hell, my R1200RT has to be broken in half to lube up the splines on the clutch. This seems pretty reasonable.

Next is the swingarm. Once that's complete, I'll put the wheels and handlebars on.

Aloha,
john

__________________

John
55 - R50, 06-R1200RT, 96-M900, 10-TU250x

schrader7032
schrader7032's picture
 Offline
VBMWMO #7032
San Antonio, TX
Joined: 10/27/2006
Posts: 6270
John - Sorry about posts not

John -

Sorry about posts not showing up. I hadn't noticed that your last post was snagged by the forum software "police". It uses some algorithm to identify spam and sadly thought your post was. Maybe it was the reference to the hugely popular Ti-35 calculator!! Anyway, I've reset your last post and it should now appear in the forum.

__________________

Kurt in S.A.
'78 R100/7 '69 R69S '52 R25/2

johnpst
johnpst's picture
 Offline
Hawaii
Joined: 03/22/2016
Posts: 57
BACK IN BUSINESS

Aloha and thank you Kurt,

Okay, I'll post in a little while and get some photos fired up and back to business.

John

__________________

John
55 - R50, 06-R1200RT, 96-M900, 10-TU250x

johnpst
johnpst's picture
 Offline
Hawaii
Joined: 03/22/2016
Posts: 57
DISTRACTIONS

Aloha,

I have done some work on the R50 but, not enough to really write about. I'm still waiting on the body parts from paint. Yes, they've been there for months... I'm confident I will some day see them again and pretty sure I will like the result but, dang... This is taking forever.

So, in order to fund my projects, I do work for others. Sometimes I buy them, transform them and sell them and sometimes I take in customer bikes.

Recently I found a Suzuki TU250x on CL for sale on the North Shore of Oahu. The photo indicated it would be a pretty straight forward clean, tune, mod to taste, and sell. When I got to it, wow! The rust monsters got a hold of it, there was no key and the tires had just bled to death. It's a great story of how soldiers look after each other not only on the battlefield but at home. The owner was sent to training on the mainland and ended up with permanent transfer orders. He left the bike with a buddy who sold it for him. Anyway, see the attached photos for the transformation. I did't really get any great shots of the before. Sold day one for top dollar.

Also, a Duc is next on the project list. The R50 is the priority but, gotta pay for things. Anyway, the Duc didn't run so price was very reasonable. Plug the coils back in, charge the battery, and it runs fine. By the way, these things are brutally powerful.

Thanks all. I'll get the crankshaft stories back up a little later.

Thanks for all the support everyone.

John

  • img_5240.jpg
  • img_5235.jpg
  • img_5218.jpg
__________________

John
55 - R50, 06-R1200RT, 96-M900, 10-TU250x

johnpst
johnpst's picture
 Offline
Hawaii
Joined: 03/22/2016
Posts: 57
BACK TO WORK

Aloha,

Not much new. Small details coming together.

First, anyone that says the easy stuff is easy, is wrong. Installing the rear brakes for example. This is just a pain in the o'kole (arse for your Britts). Now, it's a simple matter of putting the swinging arm on, installing the final drive unit, positioning the brake lever correctly, threading the brake link rod through, etc. Well, all of that is the easy part. Getting the cotter pin through the transfer link is an absolute pain in the o'kole. Now, this is like the swinging arm bearing mentioned earlier, just one of those days. The job really isn't that hard but, two cotter pins took me about 45 minutes to get them in. Can't explain it. All good now.

Complaining aside, things are going pretty well. I've replaced the head bearings with taper bearings. Very nice. Easy modification. No machining, just install. If you powder coat, be careful not to get the material too thick on the upper bearing "cover". Coating on the interior will bind on the frame. Simple matter but, just be prepared for it. I was able to thin the coating with some emery cloth without removing it. Works fine. Remember to properly shim the triple clamp properly.

Shimming the front swingarm can, as Barrington and Vech advise, be another painful task. Certainly not impossible but, another real beer burning talk to yourself (okay, to myself) event. Some folks file the edges of the shims so that they will slip between the folk and the top hat. If you've never done this job, it's hard to picture. Trust me, when you are done, you will remember it. I did not chamfer the edge. I John Wayne'd it. No issues, just time consuming.

Installing the front end was uneventful. The Bloomberg book outlines an excellent starting point for setting the front brake lever on the hub. It's always good to mark things that work so, I've etched marks into the shaft with a file to promote repetition of location.

Okay, the engine is coming up. The paint job was just reported to be complete so, I'll pick that up on the weekend. I got inspired by BMW Motorcycle Magazine, an article based on a R60/2 from Anchorage, named "A Hint of Red". My wife liked the colors so, I was inspired by (stole) it.

  • Earls Forks before installation.
  • Earls Fork Swinging Arm Shim
  • Earl Fork Swinging Arm Shim
  • Frame before taper bearing installation
  • Frame assembly, swinging arm
  • Frame assembly, right side up
  • Frame assembly, forks on
  • Measuring front brake lever from adjuster
  • Marking the brake cam shaft for reference.
  • Front brakes installed
  • Upcoming project, engine cleaning
__________________

John
55 - R50, 06-R1200RT, 96-M900, 10-TU250x

johnpst
johnpst's picture
 Offline
Hawaii
Joined: 03/22/2016
Posts: 57
BACK ON TRACK - ENGINE BUILDING

Aloha all,

It's been a busy summer filled with other than BMW work.

Well, finally, thanks to Thomas here in Hawaii, I was able to break free and get some solid work done last weekend. Thomas has the Cycle Works engine stands. It's a great tool. Thomas has also built a few of these bikes so, the combination of tools and experience was the perfect recipe for an afternoon swapping stories and putting the crank and cam in.

First, see that Barrington has to say. The rear bearing carrier has the slightest of lip and Barrington says to replace it. There is no clearance given by any authority that I'm aware of (Clymer, BMW, Barrington, this site...). Barrington recommends replacement if there is "any" step which can catch a fingernail. Being an engineer, "any" is not a technical data point so, we took the measurements of the bearing OD and the carrier ID. The bearing is, and should be, 72 mm (2.8346"). The ID of the carrier is 71.98 mm (2.8338") so, there's interference. The coefficient of expansion for aluminum is such that, this interference will remain at any expected operating temperature of this engine. Since this bearing is designed to allow some axial motion for crankshaft expansion and contraction and the fact that empirically, we proved that the carrier has interference at equal temperature to the bearing I decided to keep it in service. The use of some 220 grit emery to remove the slight lip without removing bearing contact material and we're in business.

NOTE: I had never met Thomas' wife and therefore was not fully confident that my engine was clean enough to share space in their oven so, we attempted crankshaft installation with MAPP gas. No good. It could have worked, eventually but, aluminum is used for a heat sink for a reason. It can more heat rapidly. Using MAPP to locally heat the rear of the engine case would cool by the time the crankshaft was installed. Thomas put it in the oven, we cleaned and swapped stories, and installed flawlessly. Moral? Use an oven for this job.

Thomas and I are both busy people, we have worked on contacting each other over the months and have not been able to meet in person. A phone call a couple of weeks ago left it at, I'll call you when I have an afternoon that I'm not surfing or working. Thomas called last weekend and offered his garage and tools and I had a couple of hours so, I grabbed my engine and what I thought were all the parts we need. I didn't want to keep him waiting while I moved my other motorcycles and dug through the R50 bins. Why do I outline this conversation? I did not grab all of the parts. Though all of my parts are bagged and labeled, they are in a box which weighs 200 lbs. Oil pump gears, cam cover screws for example. Thomas donated his oil pump gears to the cause. Thank you Thomas!! This could have gone much worse had you not been there.

Other than the drama of the rear bearing retainer, everything else went off without incident.

So, on to the details:

Before working with Thomas, the case was hand cleaned and I used solvent to clean the oil passages. I'm not going to a new motorcycle look. I'm going for a very well taken car of 60 year old motorcycle look with all of the patina.

I chased all of the thread both in the case and all of the fasteners to insure they tighten properly and do not bind.

I cleaned all of the sealing surfaces with Sctotchbright pads to remove old schmaltz. I also took a straight edge to all of the sealing surfaces and check for inconsistencies. I cleaned burrs with a light stone.

I measured everything to insure there would be no surprises on installation. Bearing diameters, retainers. bearing carrier to case fit, shim thicknesses, etc. All ready for installation.

I installed the slingers and staked the screws. I also followed Barrington's advice to use blue Locktite

I installed the bearings on the crankshaft and into the front bearing carrier without incident. All went as Barrington recommended.

Thanks for the support everyone. You've all provided great advice and resources for this to be a success.

John

  • img_5276.jpg
  • img_5277.jpg
  • img_5278.jpg
  • img_5283.jpg
  • img_5286.jpg
  • img_5288.jpg
  • img_5291.jpg
  • img_5292.jpg
  • img_5301.jpg
__________________

John
55 - R50, 06-R1200RT, 96-M900, 10-TU250x

johnpst
johnpst's picture
 Offline
Hawaii
Joined: 03/22/2016
Posts: 57
ENGINE ASSEMBLY

Aloha,

Ever put something together and think, hmmm, that doesn't seem right. All of the bearings on this bike are interference fit. The design is such that heating the aluminum to a given temperature will open up the fit to something you can push the bearings into the bore without too much force.

I put the timing cover on by heating it and after installation thought, hmmm, "that was easy." Now, remember that the primary cause of the original failure was the bearing cages failing allowing the balls to come loose, allowing the crankshaft to flail wildly. The bearing cover had some minor scars on it but, no sign that the nose bearing spun in the fit so, I took no effort to replace or repair it. I just cleaned up the scars and kept it.

It bugged me so, I got absolution from Vech. I looked up some guideline for a bearing of this type and application which are close but not quite what Vech recommended but, Because I"m lazy and, Vech has decades of experience who told me, the bearing can be removed by hand so, as long is it doesn't show signs of spinning and there is some tightness to the fit, it's fine.

Everything else was no drama. Installing the seals. No issue. Cleaning and surfacing the sealing surfaces and parting lines. No drama.

The oil pump gear has quit a bit, 0.07mm clearance, backlash. Now, I believe it's a linearly loaded gear so, there will be no issues but, it took me by surprise.

  • img_5309.jpg
  • img_5310.jpg
  • img_5311.jpg
  • img_5313.jpg
  • img_5314.jpg
  • img_5315.jpg
  • img_5316.jpg
  • img_5318.jpg
  • img_5319.jpg
  • img_5320.jpg
__________________

John
55 - R50, 06-R1200RT, 96-M900, 10-TU250x

808Airhead
808Airhead's picture
 Offline
VBMWMO #7677
Joined: 08/05/2009
Posts: 991
Looking good!! I had the same

Looking good!! I had the same situation as you with my R69S motor,I used the loctite yellow (or was it green?) bearing locker,and seems fine almost 10K miles later. My new oil pump gears had same backlash as my old ones I gave you,lol. I would not worry too much on that. Getting there!

__________________

Thomas M.
R69s - R60/2 - R67/2 - R51/3

808Airhead
808Airhead's picture
 Offline
VBMWMO #7677
Joined: 08/05/2009
Posts: 991
Looking good!! I had the same

Looking good!! I had the same situation as you with my R69S motor,my front nose bearing was a little too easy to fit in the front end.I used the loctite yellow (or was it green?) bearing locker,and seems fine almost 10K miles later. My new oil pump gears had same backlash as my old ones I gave you,lol. I would not worry too much on that. Getting there!

__________________

Thomas M.
R69s - R60/2 - R67/2 - R51/3

johnpst
johnpst's picture
 Offline
Hawaii
Joined: 03/22/2016
Posts: 57
ENGINE BOTTOM END COMPLETE

Thanks Thomas,

Yea, I followed your lead with bearing locker just to be sure. I have just about 0.00023" fit which slightly warming the engine will overcome. Bearing locker is a little insurance.

Bottom end, flywheel, and clutch assembled.

First off, it's all easy so, there has been no drama throughout this build. As all know, the Barrington manual with assistance from Clymer and BMW's manuals make this a very straight forward engine. Engineering is the use of scientific principals solve problems. Great engineers make it look easy. Max Friz made this an art. The special tools required are easily fabricated and thank God Cycle Works can provide them at a reasonable price.

I learned something today that will go along with much advice I've given on the ignition system on these bikes. I found, as many have, the while timing these bikes, after timing the magneto, you've run out of room to adjust ignition timing. I have read many stories of folks having to move the magneto out of timing in order to get proper ignition timing. It never occurred to me that I could pull the magneto rotor off and rotate it a couple of degrees. Way cool.

Another thing is, when pushing the rear main seal in, you can use the CycleWorks shock compressor tool. See the photo below. I will allow you to use the flywheel bolt to press the seal in evenly. It won't take it to flush because the bearing carrier studs are just a little long but, it will take it 90%.

i'm installing a lightened flywheel to give it a shot. I live on a 3 mile long hill and having to wait for the engine to drop to speed causes me to loose substantial speed so by the time I shift I'm lugging the engine. I figured the worst thing that can happen is I don't like it. It'll take me a couple of days to change out.

Next is the electrical system and bolt the sheet metal on.

Thanks all,
John

  • img_5301.jpg
  • img_5302.jpg
  • img_5303.jpg
  • img_5304.jpg
  • img_5305.jpg
  • img_5308.jpg
  • img_5311.jpg
  • img_5312.jpg
  • img_5315.jpg
  • img_5316.jpg
  • img_5317.jpg
  • img_5318.jpg
  • img_5321.jpg
  • img_5322.jpg
  • img_5323.jpg
  • img_5324.jpg
  • img_5326.jpg
  • img_5327.jpg
__________________

John
55 - R50, 06-R1200RT, 96-M900, 10-TU250x

Daves79x
Daves79x's picture
 Offline
VBMWMO #9030
Joined: 08/09/2015
Posts: 227
You Run Out

You run out of timing adjustment because the points rubbing block won't allow proper points gap AND proper timing adjustment. Went through this on my build last year. Get Vech's points and you'll be able to get the proper points gap set and get the timing set without moving the magneto rotor or slotting the points plate. I've been given to understand that it's not a good idea to move the magneto timing. Although Barrington does mention it for a 'quick fix'.

It's just such a pain to remove the advancer and do all that several times. Every time you remove the advancer, the differential timing gets messed up and you have to go through all that again. I've come to the conclusion that having these bikes be a 'one-kick' starter has more to do with keeping the magneto timing correct than it does with actual correct point gap, if that what yours comes down to.

As I said, I finally yielded and got Vech's points and that fixed all that.

Thanks again for chronicling your build and the great detailed photos!

Dave

__________________

Dave

johnpst
johnpst's picture
 Offline
Hawaii
Joined: 03/22/2016
Posts: 57
DONE, KINDA

Aloha all,

Thank you for all of your support. I've been working a lot lately and have had very small windows of time to complete this project so, photo documentation has not been the top priority. The good news is that there no serious issues during reassembly to document. Bolting things together is pretty straight forward.

Thank you to Tom Marino for allowing me to put my engine in his family's oven (if you done this you know why) and loaning me your oil pump. If you need anything, just call.

Thank you Dan Neiner of Cycle Works. You provided the tools, rebuilt the crankshaft, lightened the flywheel (more on this later), and balanced the rotating train. It all works well.

Vech and Richard, you provided consultation and parts for most of this. I appreciate your supplying parts to pre-fit (swingarm shims, steering shims and the like, allowing me to send back the non-used. It really helped save time during assembly. Richard's advice on disassembling the shocks really helped as well.

So, what did I learn from this?

1. Sheet metal is a b!&ch. Aligning my front fender to not rub on the shocks took more time than assembling the engine. Once I thought I had clearance I removed the Ace bandages I used to protect the paint and rode it just to find out that the fender is moving and scratched the shock cover. More work to follow.

2. Make sure if you hire folks to do any work, they know what they are doing. I've already gone over my issues with the cylinder head rebuild. After I pulled them apart and corrected the spring size and cleaned them up, they work fine.

2-a. The guy that did my paint also re-coated the gas tank interior. Rule one, if the coating in yours is in good shape, leave it. My guy used one of the name brand coatings and did not prep it correctly or roll it to prevent buildup. From the filler hole, everything looked fine. When I put the petcock in I found the fitting plugged. What I thought would be a thin layer turned out to be 1/2" thick plug. I power washed the interior of the tank and found that the whole bottom of the tank was about 1/2" thick. The good news is that the original coat is still it great shape and allowed the new coating to come off pretty handily.

3. Take very good notes when removing the engine as to where the mounting shims go. I got the engine in a found that the engine was too far to the left causing me to have to move the shims. Not a big deal but, I didn't find any other documentation of this so, thought I'd mention it here.

4. I'm going to put modern tires on this. Rain grooves are killer on original vintage tires.

I'll get pictures on the next note. I didn't take a lot but, I do have some.

Again, thanks all for the support and encouragement. My next project is a Ducati so, you won't see it here.

John

__________________

John
55 - R50, 06-R1200RT, 96-M900, 10-TU250x

johnpst
johnpst's picture
 Offline
Hawaii
Joined: 03/22/2016
Posts: 57
LESSONS LEARNED

Aloha,

Well, I've been riding the bike for a few weeks. I've found some issues over time that, well, only time will tell. Other issues that could have been avoided by following my own advice.

Let's discuss coating and sheet metal restoration.

As I mentioned earlier about the tank coating, I've attached photos to show what just cannot be expressed in words.

Last week, I noticed gas dripping under the bike. I found fuel leaking from the tunnel. I removed the tank and found fuel leaking under the new paint. My first thought was that they guy I just paid some significant money to for paint completely missed a rust hole. How would that be possible? See the photo below but, when digging though the paint I found that he had drilled a 1-1/2" hole to do repairs to the top of the tank. This brings the question, why didn't he use the hole provided by BMW at manufacture but, that question will never be answered. He closed the hole, get this, using an aluminum sheet and JB Weld. That's right, JB Weld. Everyone knows that aluminum and steel have a significant coefficient of expansion, right? If not, it does. There is no way that epoxy will keep a seal with that much relative movement. Anyway, see the pictures.

Everyone has read about how these bike will become hard to start hot if the coil is failing, right? If not, trust me, it does. The bike ran as well as I thought it could given a 6v ignition and carburation up until last Saturday. I rode ~22 miles to Honolulu and back. I parked for lunch. After 40 minutes or so, I tried starting the bike. It was harder than usual, 5 or 6 kicks instead of two. I just thought it was hot and carburetetor issues. I rod about a mile and was stopped at a traffic signal. It was idling very rough. Again, I wrote it off as just being hot. When the light changed, I gave it some gas to accelerate. It coughed and died. I hid my face and pushed it out of the intersection. After 30 minutes I got it running and ran home, up a 3 mile hill at 8% grade. I did not want to push. I remembered reading the articles on this site about the coil and had a new one that I just hadn't installed. No troubleshooting involved. I just replaced the coil. It started first kick and has continued that ever since. It idles as smooth as my R1200RT. I no longer feels fragile. I don't feel the need to blip the throttle to keep it running. Further testing of the ignition coil by heating with a blow dryer found that it shorted out at 160 degrees F.

If you are planning on ridding these around rain grooves, DO NOT use Metzler Block C. I changed to Avon AM26. Much better. I'm pretty sure that my death certificate would not indicate how original the tires looked.

The pictures tell the story. If you have any questions or want to see any specific pictures of a part, let me know.

Thanks again for all the support. This site and you folks provided the answers to all of my questions regarding this build.

John

  • Tank Coating Floating Around
  • One Piece of Tank Coating
  • Most of the Tank Coating After Removal
  • First Signs of Gas Tank Leak
  • Deeper Digging On Fuel Tank Leak
  • Completely Removed Paint and aluminum cover
  • Aluminum Cover Removed.
  • After Build Photo
  • A view from the cockpit.
  • A little time travel, 1955 to 2006.
__________________

John
55 - R50, 06-R1200RT, 96-M900, 10-TU250x

Daves79x
Daves79x's picture
 Offline
VBMWMO #9030
Joined: 08/09/2015
Posts: 227
Looks Like

Looks like you are getting it sorted. Bummer, real bummer about the tank. Should have been welded shut. Hope you got that permanently fixed now. I've had a few minor issues with my total rebuild/restoration, but nothing like that. I'm happy now with how my bike runs and drives - hope you are there or close to there soon! 3 degrees here this AM - bike riding is only a memory right now! Thanks so much for posting your journey.

Dave

__________________

Dave

stagewex
stagewex's picture
 Offline
VBMWMO #8810
Joined: 10/26/2014
Posts: 444
Period correct Heidenau's are

Period correct Heidenau's are equally scary on those grooves. Replacing when they wear out but the damn things just won't wear!

That sucks about the tank, real amateur stuff. Can it be salvaged or are you going to get another tank? Just wondering where the line between replacing and repairing goes?

__________________

mike wex/stagewex
1969 BMW r60/2, US Model, 1995 BMW K75, 2006 Yamaha TW200, 2007 Ural Patrol

miller6997
miller6997's picture
 Offline
VBMWMO #6997
Joined: 10/27/2006
Posts: 917
Name the painter?

Your story about your tank is a jaw-dropper. Perhaps you should name the painter so that others can avoid him.

__________________

Jon Miller
'67 R69S
'13 F800GT

johnpst
johnpst's picture
 Offline
Hawaii
Joined: 03/22/2016
Posts: 57
THE MACHINE NEVER WINS

Aloha Mike,

I considered the Heidenau's but... One thing to be sure of, the steering geometry lends itself be a little sensitive no matter what tires so, do not expect your bike to be transformed into the 80's by changing tires but, it's still WAY more stable with the AM26's.

Nope. Not replacing the tank. It's not in that bad of shape. The steel is still in very good condition. The original red coat is still intact and there is almost no corrosion. The only damage was the dent in the top, there when I got the bike, and what the painter did. See the photo.

My experience for replace over repair now is, if I were to do the work myself, I would go pretty deep to salvage the original. Mostly for the challenge of it. I don't have a lot of time, tools, nor bodywork skill so, I hire folks for this. Now cost becomes the defining factor. The cost to hire someone to do a lot of weld, lead/brass-work dent correction + paint. Seems to me replace and repaint is a more economical path.

John

  • img_0679.jpg
  • img_5643.jpg
__________________

John
55 - R50, 06-R1200RT, 96-M900, 10-TU250x

johnpst
johnpst's picture
 Offline
Hawaii
Joined: 03/22/2016
Posts: 57
HAWAII'S A SMALL PLACE

Aloha,

I'm pretty confident everyone who might suffer by this guy's work knows by now. I've spoken to a lot of influential folks. I've also spoken to the painter directly. We will work this out and hopefully, he will learn from this and not repeat it.

I'm a pretty big Caveat Emptor believer. Thomas warned me about this, although even he's surprised by how bad it was.

If you live here and plan on getting some work done, message me directly and I'll fill you in.

John

__________________

John
55 - R50, 06-R1200RT, 96-M900, 10-TU250x

johnpst
johnpst's picture
 Offline
Hawaii
Joined: 03/22/2016
Posts: 57
Burr!

Aloha Dave,

I brazed it up temporarily. I will pull all of the sheet metal off next winter and re-do it properly. Right now, I just want to ride it. It's been almost two years.

I'm very close to what I think is perfection on this. As I posted, the front fender is still cocked to the right a little and rubbing on the right shock. Need to fix that. Right now, I've shimmed the shock out with a washer.

I think I'm going to change the front tire to a 100/90 vs the 110/90. Could be a little quicker steering without being twitchy.

Looks like your weather is not going to warm up for a couple of weeks looking at the news. My kids live in North Carolina and it's 15 degrees now. Stay warm.

The photo below is Yokohama's beach (north west short of O'ahu) this morning. Come visit us. Probably cheaper than heating oil for the winter.

John

  • img_5638.jpg
__________________

John
55 - R50, 06-R1200RT, 96-M900, 10-TU250x

stagewex
stagewex's picture
 Offline
VBMWMO #8810
Joined: 10/26/2014
Posts: 444
FYI: There is an r50-r60

FYI: There is an r50-r60 correct tank on fleabay as of this morning with a starting bid of $250.00.

__________________

mike wex/stagewex
1969 BMW r60/2, US Model, 1995 BMW K75, 2006 Yamaha TW200, 2007 Ural Patrol

johnpst
johnpst's picture
 Offline
Hawaii
Joined: 03/22/2016
Posts: 57
SEE, CHEAP

Thanks Stagewrx,

It's my experience that these are pretty easy builds with parts readily available. This is just one example.

Aloha all,
John

__________________

John
55 - R50, 06-R1200RT, 96-M900, 10-TU250x

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.