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sblaylock
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Joined: 07/22/2010
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I'm helping a friend get his R60/5 running, which has been sitting for the past 8 years. I drained the oil and found it flowed like water and had a very strong smell of gas. I pulled the oil filter and found the same - very strong smell of gas. My guess is either the petcock was left on and it allowed the fuel to drain into one or both cylinder(s) and down to the case, or the petcock is not stopping the fuel.

Either way, I'm trying to figure out the best method to ensure all the gas/oil mixture is out. I was thinking I should pull the pan off and clean everything. Fill with cheap 20w50. Remove the spark plugs and pour a bit of oil in the cylinders and let it sit for a couple of days. Kick the engine through a few times by hand with the plugs removed to try to get oil to the ring pack. If that seems OK then try to start it. If it starts, run it at idle for a few minutes, then drain the oil. Either fill it with VR1 Racing oil and call it good, or put another load of cheap 20w50 and run it again, drain, then fill it with the VR1.

Does this sound like a good plan, or is there something else I should do? Should I pull the heads to inspect the cylinders before doing anything?

Thanks for the help,
Scott.

schrader7032
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San Antonio, TX
Joined: 10/27/2006
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Scott - Sounds like a good

Scott -

Sounds like a good plan. I might consider running the engine a bit more, maybe taking a short 15-20 minute ride in order to really get things up to operating temperature. Maybe another round of oil for more than just the short ride, like maybe a couple hundred miles, then change.

My question might be...why consider using a cheap grade of oil? Why not use the best all the time, getting the best protection regardless? It's not going to cost that much extra...you'll have more peace of mind IMO.

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Kurt in S.A.
'78 R100/7 '69 R69S '52 R25/2

sblaylock
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Hi Kurt, Having never dealt

Hi Kurt,

Having never dealt with this issue before, I'm happy to hear my plan seems relatively sound. I agree, I should probably put a few more miles on the bike between changes. I just wanted to ensure I didn't cause any crank or big-end issues.

The only reason I was keeping the VR1 for the final load is it's getting hard to find here in Victoria, BC. I cleaned out Walmart of the last 8 liters they had and their online store is out as well. I can get Lucas 20w50 classic with high ZDDP (2100ppm) cheaper than the VR1 so my plan was to use that for the first two oil fills.

Scott.

khittner
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Lubing the cylinders/rings as

Lubing the cylinders/rings as you intend is worth doing, but there isn't much oil sitting around in the engine when it's not running; it flows back to the oil pan. Assuming that you're doing your oil change on fairly level ground, once you drain it, you've gotten out the fuel/oil mixture that's in there. The flow rate of the oil pump puts the whole 2qt. oil capacity of the bike through the engine several times per minute, so the new oil is going to flush out any fuel that might've gotten into the the engine, in very short order. If you want to drop the oil pan to see/clean out any sludge from its previous use, fine, but the fuel contamination issue doesn't really necessitate it.

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Konrad

sblaylock
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Thanks Konrad, In that case,

Thanks Konrad,

In that case, I'll probably just leave the pan attached and let the pump run the new oil through the system.

Scott.

mark_weiss
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Arizona
Joined: 11/16/2013
Posts: 170
When I work on bikes that

When I work on bikes that have fuel in the oil, I drain the oil and change the filter just as you have done. I then remove the spark plugs and crank the engine long enough for the oil pressure light to extinguish. By then, the bike is ready to start. If you want to really be sure that fresh oil has been pushed through the entire oil system, remove the valve covers before cranking the starter and then turn the engine until oil is running from the rockers. Don't run the starter for more than thirty seconds at a time.

After going through this procedure I'll run the bike long enough to reach full operating temperature, 15 miles or more, and then drain and refill the oil again. Running to full operating temperature will evaporate any remaining fuel hiding in any crankcase nooks or crannies.

One more thing: Then find out why the fuel is overflowing.

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Mark
qualitycycleservice.com

sblaylock
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Another Classic is back on the Road

Thanks for all the input.

I did run the starter until oil light went out. Replaced the plugs and started it. There was a fair amount of blue smoke due to the residual oil from when I put the tbsp of oil in each cylinder to help the rings. Took the bike for a good ride; 20 -30 minutes, brought it home and changed the oil again. It all sounds normal. The owner is very happy to have his bike back running, and I'm happy to get another old BMW back on the road.

Thanks again for the help,
Scott.

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