Darryl.Richman's picture

Now You Can Support Team Boxer Rebellion!

I have finally got my website set up and can offer the following sponsorship opportunities so you can participate in Team Boxer Rebellion:

  • Buy Stickers! - I have 4" x 3" stickers available, at $2 each or 3 for $5.
  • Put Your Name on the Chase Van - For $40, your name will be proudly displayed on the side of my big, yellow Sprinter van as it heads east to the start and west to the finish.
  • Donate Directly - Any amount is helpful, and you get to pick it.

You've already seen here where some of the expenses are in this undertaking. At $4.25/gallon for diesel and $4/gallon for gas, not to mention meals and hotel rooms for 17 days, for 5 people, it adds up quick. Even just the oil and lube changes each day for the bike turn into more than $200. If you feel so inclined, any support for the Team is really appreciated. Thanks in advance for your consideration!

A few people have already contributed, and I'd like to mention them here:

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Darryl.Richman's picture

Final Drive Issues

I was really hoping to ride the old girl out to the NorCal '49er Rally this Memorial Day weekend. The trip from Santa Cruz to Mariposa is about 160 miles one way and involves going over a couple pretty good passes (Hecker and Pacheco, the latter would require dicing it up with the trucks in the right lane).

Brent and I got the R52 back together again a couple weeks ago, and he told me to go out and "break it". I put about 100 miles on it, riding around locally so as not to require some kind Samaritan to have to drive too far away to come get me. But nothing broke, and things looked pretty good.

I have to say that stepping down a tooth on the pinion (from 13:57 to 12:57) seems like a good idea. In my informal testing, I could get about half way up a hill in 2nd that previously almost immediately required me to downshift to first. I also think I have the carb a bit better dialed in now.

In fact, it was while working on the carb and running the bike up and down the street in front of my house, that it felt like the clutch was slipping. That's annoying, because changing the clutch requires splitting the cases. (It wasn't until 1933 that BMW figured out how to leave the back of the bell housing open on the motor.) And sure enough, the next time I let out the clutch, the bike didn't move.

I looked down at it and was, therefore, quite surprised to see that the driveshaft was spinning! That meant that the final drive was where the slipping was occuring. I would have expected such slippage to be accompanied by really awful and expensive noises -- gear teeth chewing each other up. My new ring gear! My new pinion!

Once I had the final drive off the bike and apart, at first didn't understand what was wrong. No broken teeth. Everthing in proper mesh. Even the traces of Prussian Blue that Brent had applied were still on the edges, tops and bottoms of some of the teeth, showing that the shimming he had done was right. But on closer fiddling... err... inspection, I realized that the carrier, on which the ring gear is mounted, was pressed onto the hollow shaft that drives the rear wheel. And, "was" was the operative word.

The interference fit wasn't good enough, and now the inside of the carrier and the outside of the shaft were seriously galled. I left the parts with Brent after some discussion, and he said he would clean up the carrier and have the shaft built up, then turned down and both pieces polished.

But that won't happen for another week. I guess I'm going to ride something modern to the '49er.

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Comments

Was that just an interference

Jim Hansen's picture

Was that just an interference fit, or a shallow taper? It seems like a shallow taper would be better, but what do I know.

Although the shaft is really

Darryl.Richman's picture

Although the shaft is really chewed up, it seemed generally straight. A taper is very strong, but requires something to hold the two pieces together, like really big screw that holds the flywheel to the crankshaft on a /2.

--Darryl Richman
http://darryl.crafty-fox.com
"Bling is not made in Germany" --OTL, 12/05

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Darryl.Richman's picture

Trans rebuild

One of the places I had never been on this bike was the transmission. Oh, sure, I had taken the top off before, but that's not a big deal. I wanted to go through it because it whines pretty loudly, especially in 3rd gear, and mostly because I wanted to be sure that nothing was going to pop up and surprise me on this trip.

There was nothing too terrible to find, fortunately. The transmission is a bit of a Chinese Puzzle; neither Brent nor I is still completely certain exactly what gyrations are necessary to free and replace the output shaft. It kind of hangs up on the shift fork and 1st gear, which is in back (see pictures below) and a bit wedged into a niche in the case. If you fiddle with it long enough, you can get it to go where you need it.

I took the time to clean up 2nd gear on the output shaft. This transmission has constant mesh gears for 1st and 3rd, but when you move the big shift lever, you're actually pushing 2nd gear around on the output shaft. This means that every time it goes into 2nd, the gears grind a bit as a prelude to meshing. 2nd didn't look bad, but there was a little bit of wear, and I used a diamond file to clean off the rough edges.

The box got new bearings and new seals, and now it doesn't weep nearly as much as it did before. The bearing on the rear of the input shaft was a neat old roller bearing. The rollers were captured by a brass ring with cutouts alternating on one side and then the other of the ring. The guy at the bearing house had never seen one like it, and because it was stamped "Germany", I think it must be a prewar item. (German items made postwar are generally stamped "West Germany" up to 1990.) Brent also shimmed up the box so it wasn't so loose.

Maybe it's a bit quieter now, but it does still whine in 3rd. Must be the straight cut teeth.

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Comments

German transmission ingenuity

Transmission guy's picture

Thanks for showing pics of this interesting transmission. As you said, to the untrained eye transmissions do look like a Chinese puzzle, and now that you've put some time in this one, you're probably that much more experienced and wiser. Hope your motorcycle lasts a very long time.

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Darryl.Richman's picture

I just saved Team Boxer Rebellion $195!

It has been a little while since I last posted -- sorry about the delay. In that time, I've been busy, however. The R52 is up at Brent Hansen's shop, where we disassembled the transmission and the final drive. There are a couple parts we're waiting for (a new ring and pinion set for the final drive) before putting it back together again. I've decided to go from a 13:57 to a 12:57 set, which will lower my top speed by just a couple mph, but I hope it will allow me to spend more time in 3rd gear, instead of having to downshift at the slightest grade.

(I have also been working on a transmission for my R69 project. And last weekend I had my annual Surf City Tech Day, where about 50 people showed up at my house and ate lots of delectable smoked top sirloin.)

Today, however, a little tinkering has saved the team a nice bit of cash. We riders have been advised to acquire a rally roadbook holder, to make following the route instructions each day a lot easier. If you don't know what that is, welcome to rallying! It's basically a box that is mounted to the handlebars. The course route sheets are taped together into a long scroll and wound onto one of two dowels. Then, as you follow the course, you roll a knob on the outside of the box to scroll the route sheets past the window on top. These are used by enduro riders and bicyclists, mainly, and they used paper that is 4-6" wide so they don't need a huge roadbook holder.

Unfortunately, we will be getting route instructions that are printed on normal 8.5" wide paper. It can be trimmed to 6.5" (just barely) without losing information, but we could have 10 or more sheets to trim and tape every day. Touratech is the only company that produces a roadbook holder for 8.5" paper, although there's an Acerbis model that will take 6.5" paper. They're expensive, though: the Touratech unit is $210:

I'm sure that, like all the great stuff from Touratech, this thing is bombproof. Being the cheap guy that I am, I've been musing over what I could make or adapt for this function. I was wandering through Home Depot a week ago -- I needed a hose clamp for a new dryer vent -- when I noticed a parts box that looked like it might be useful for carrying an assortment of extra fasteners on this trip. Suddenly, I had a flash: this was my roadbook holder!

At $3.50 for the clear, soft plastic box, with a real hinged top that clamps closed, it wasn't a huge gamble. A couple extra trips to the hardware store to look at "stuff" netted me two 1' x 1/4" aluminum rods, some nylon spacers and bushings and axle nuts. A couple of small, wooden drawer knobs, and my shopping was complete. It cost me a bit north of $10.

I threaded one end of each dowel and screwed the knobs on. I cut out some of the internal separator walls to leave me a near perfect 8 3/4" width area. I only had to drill holes on one side of the box for the dowels, because I had one internal separator left to support them. I drilled holes and installed the nylon bushings with a dab of caulk. The dowels turn with some friction in the nylon bushings, which holds the paper exactly where I turn it. The pictures below show my roadbook holder with 21 uncut 8.5 x 11 pages loaded, and there's room for even more if needed.

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Comments

Darryl, I made something

Bob Childers's picture

Darryl, I made something similar to this probably 45/50 years ago for enduros. I made mine out of aluminum and to use adding machine paper since that was all I had handy. It mounted between the handle bars and worked fine. I still have the box here someplace. Bob

Hi..

Motorcycle Trader's picture

Nice.
You had done good job.

Now sell one to each of the

miller6997's picture

Now sell one to each of the Cannonball entrants and you've recovered the cost of your new ring and pinion. When's your IPO?

'67 R69S
'05 R1200RT

Scrolling Away

Jim Hansen's picture

In this high-tech age of GPS, iPhones, etc., I find the visual image of a person (who happens to be a computer expert) scrolling through numerous doweled pages of route instructions to be rather humorous. On the other hand, if you're riding a 1928 R52, I suppose it's quite appropriate.

Awesome

LtJ's picture

Great low tech/budget idea!

Something old, something new

Darryl.Richman's picture

Quote:

In this high-tech age of GPS, iPhones, etc., I find the visual image of a person (who happens to be a computer expert) scrolling through numerous doweled pages of route instructions to be rather humorous. On the other hand, if you're riding a 1928 R52, I suppose it's quite appropriate.

Funny thing, isn't it? We're allowed, even required, to update our bikes in certain ways, but prohibited in others. There's no limitation, for example, to how modern the brakes can be, but we're supposed to retain the original carburetion and ignition. We are allowed to have cell phones, but GPS systems are prohibited -- how does that work for any modern smartphone?

--Darryl Richman
http://darryl.crafty-fox.com
"Bling is not made in Germany" --OTL, 12/05

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Darryl.Richman's picture

First Sponsor - Joel Rapose!

Joel Rapose, who sells the PowerDynamo 12V alternator and electronic ignition kit for BMW /2s, as well as a heavy steel plate that can be used to mount /2 and Airhead engines and transmissions while you work on them, sent me a very generous check to help support Team Boxer Rebellion. His name will be up on the side of my Sprinter chase van as we travel back and forth across the country.

Just to give you an idea of the costs for this folly, consider:

Entry fee: $1500
Hotel bill per double occupancy room: $1900 x 3 rooms
Diesel for my van over 8,000 miles: $1500
Gas for the R52: $450
Restaurant meals for 4 weeks on the road, $30/day: $840 x 5 people
Spares and tools: sky's the limit

As you can see, participating in this event is essentially the cost of a new BMW bike!

Early next month I will have several ways to become a sponsor, from any business that would like to see their advertisement on my van, to smaller contributors who will get their name up there, to T-shirts and other items. (This will be completely separate from any club function.)

Comments

I hope to see you in Sept. I

Bob Distelcamp's picture

I hope to see you in Sept. I live about 1 hour from Newberg,Ny If there is anythingI can do to help
Please let me know 518 966 0083

Bob D

Muskegon, Mi. to Milwaukee, Wi.

Bob Childers's picture

When are you going to be in Muskegon to board the ferry?

September 9th we are

Darryl.Richman's picture

September 9th we are scheduled to ride from Sandusky, OH to Muskegon and then take the 4:45pm ferry crossing to Milwaukee, which should get us there at 6:15pm. From the ferry dock in Milwaukee we will ride to the Harley museum.

--Darryl Richman
http://darryl.crafty-fox.com
"Bling is not made in Germany" --OTL, 12/05

You all enjoy your best

seanblake's picture

You all enjoy your best rides...Have a great ride in September!!!

____________________
BT business phone line

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